Trump mistakes are making China great again

It becomes clear now that the twenty-first century is signaling the arrival of a new world order while Trump mistakes are making China great again.
As the uncertainty and instability associated with this process spread throughout the world, the West’s response was either awe and confusion, or nostalgia for older forms of nationalism that had failed in the past and would certainly not work now.

Even from the perspective of the most upbeat optimists; the G-7 summit recently hosted by Quebec was proof that the geopolitical West was breaking apart, losing its global significance, and that the greatest destroyer of this system – created by Americans and led by Americans – was only the president of the United States. Donald Trump is undoubtedly one of the symptoms of the disintegration of the West, not a cause, but it accelerates this process dramatically.

The roots of Western unease extend to the end of the Cold War, when the bipolar world order of economic globalization surrendered, allowing the emergence of new powers such as China. In the decades to come, America seems to be looking at its old alliances as a burden rather than a valuable asset.

the United States

“Although the United States remains the world’s leading superpower, China has emerged as a new and old geopolitical force, with 1.4 billion people and a huge domestic market already challenging the United States as the world’s economic, political and technological leader”

This applies not only to Europe, Japan, and South Korea but also to America’s neighbors: Canada and Mexico. Because of Trump’s decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, a deep divide between America and Canada emerged at the Quebec summit, and their trade split would have wider political consequences.

Europe and the North Atlantic dominated the world economy for four centuries. But this is no longer the case. Indeed, the geography of the new force – the transformation of the global economic center of gravity from the Atlantic to the Asia-Pacific region – does not correspond to the imaginary map of the 20th-century geopolitical situation, let alone the nineteenth century.
Although the United States remains the world’s leading superpower, China has emerged as a new and old geopolitical force. China, with 1.4 billion people and a huge domestic market, is already challenging the United States as the world’s economic, political and technological leader.

Middle kingdom

Anyone who visited the corridors of power in Beijing knows that China’s leaders have a special map of the world. On this map, China – the so-called “middle kingdom” – is in the center, while Europe moves to the left side and the United States to the right.
In other words, there has already been a division between the United States and Europe, that diverse group of small and medium-sized nation-States, and have become marginalized.

In the beginning, the United States reacted to the geopolitical changes of this century – intuitively – with what I call “turning toward Asia.” But America has long been present in both the Atlantic and the Pacific, and as the last remaining global force, it is in a position to anticipate historic geopolitical changes, so that it can protect its interests.

On the other hand, Europe was sleeping through the period of the absence of the historic throne today. The Europeans themselves were largely preoccupied with inner contemplation, old antagonisms, and nineteenth-century dreams when they ruled the world. This narrow view has been reinforced by events such as the election of Trump and Britain’s referendum in favor of exit from the European Union.

But instead of preoccupying with Trump’s strange behavior, – Trump mistakes are making China great again – we do well to remember that global developments today were a precedent for his presidency. US President Barack Obama has opened a policy of “turning toward Asia.” Trump was no exception, and his last step was to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Singapore.

Trump’s policies

To the extent that Trump’s policies pose serious risks, this is not because it represents a strategic reorientation of the United States.
Reorientation has already taken place anyway, but because it is self-contradictory and unnecessarily destructive. For example, when Trump calls for a reduction in American military involvement in the Middle East, he is echoing Obama’s remarks no more.

“When the United States looks west across the Pacific Ocean, and Europe looks eastward towards Eurasia, the only winner is China, Trump mistakes are making China great again, the real strategic threat in the Trump era is not only the change of the world order; the real danger is that Trump mistakes are making China great again

But by renouncing the nuclear deal with Iran, Trump made the war in the region more likely. When he did his best to ease North Korea’s international isolation – with almost nothing in return – it strengthened China’s position in East Asia.

Trump’s commercial war was not less self-destructive than its intended purpose; by imposing tariffs on America’s closest allies, practically pushing them into the arms of China. If European and Japanese exporters face trade barriers in the United States, what other option would they have to explore the Chinese market?

” Trump mistakes are making China great again ”

Russia on the other side

Despite Russian President Vladimir Putin’s militarism in eastern Ukraine and his efforts to influence the results of Western elections, Europe – in the absence of NATO support – has no choice but to turn towards Eurasia.

Moreover, even with the absence of US protection policies, Japan would have to absorb China’s growing economic power sooner or later. The last chance to contain China’s growing weight faded when Trump canceled the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would have created a US-led Pacific Rim in the face of China.

Therefore, “pivoting towards Asia” will yield very different results on both sides of the Atlantic. In the absence of US-EU policies to maintain transatlantic cohesion, the West will soon turn into something of the past.

When the United States looks west across the Pacific and Europe looks eastward towards Eurasia; Trump mistakes are making China great again. The real strategic threat in the Trump era is not only the change in the world order; the real danger is that Trump’s policies guarantee “making China great again.”

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